Tag Archives: tarpon

Guadeloupe: Video by Broke & Fly


 

Love the way this short film captures the joy (and frustration) of a (mostly) DIY fishing trip to an unknown location. I can relate, having done the same in Honduras, Panama, Little Cayman, Eleuthera and Acklins (both Bahamas). (Oh, yeah, and also the Florida Keys, which shows I have no idea of the boundary between reality and fantasy.)

Believe it or not, many of our guests on Grand Cayman do mostly DIY, and we encourage that. (Ok, if not actually encourage, then completely understand and are willing to give advice, fly selection and pointers to facilitate.) In fact, we are the “Local Experts” for the Cayman Islands on Rod Hamilton’s excellent website www.diyfishing.com—an great site that combines DIY fishing reports, guided reports, expert advice and some of the most comprehensive accommodations listings I’ve seen in a while. We’re happy to be a part of the DIYfishing community and (as always) wish you all:

Tight lines!
Davin Ebanks
Owner, Guide & Bonefishionado:
FISH BONES, Fly Fish Cayman!

Cayman Video: Just Below the Surface


Just Below the Surface from joel jefferson on Vimeo.

Fly Casting REVup Challenge: #7


“Beat the Wind! Use Your FULL Double-Haul.”


*

As promised here is our SKIFF EPISODE, where we REVup our Double Haul for casting in the wind, getting extra distance, and throwing big flies. Skiff fishing provides its own challenges, especially where distance is concerned. Because a boat is bigger, makes more noise and throws a bigger shadow, fish can see/sense/feel it and us from farther away. That often means longer casts are essential just to get the fly away from the boat into a zone where the fish are not yet alerted to our presence.

This is a more advanced tip, but still comes back to basic principles of casting, namely: Slack is the Enemy! Many anglers who have learned to double-haul don’t take it far enough. Specifically, they don’t get their “hauling hand” back to their casting hand before they start their forward cast. If there is a lot of space between your hands, there’s a tendency for the casting hand to MOVE TOWARD the hauling hand at the beginning of the casting stroke. This puts slack in the system, reducing bend in the rod and stealing energy from the cast.

The difference between a good caster and an expert fly caster is that the latter will end their haul with their hands nearly together. This makes it impossible for the hands to move toward each other during the casting stroke. It also provides more distance for the haul on the forward cast.

HOMEWORK:
Work on getting the hauling hand back to the casting hand BEFORE you begin your forward stroke. The line will tell you how fast. Too fast and you’ll put slack in the line. Too slow and you won’t make it all the way back. It should feel as if the line is PULLING YOUR HAND back toward the rod, after you make the haul for the backcast.

Estrada Art Presents: GladesDays



Estrada Art Presents: GladesDays from Estrada Art & Apparel on Vimeo.

Go ahead, live vicariously. Take a glimpse into the vast Everglades through the eyes and stories of official Estrada Art crewmembers. The first of a new series of films, they will take you into the ‘glades from all angles, on poling skiffs and paddle boards and kayaks. From Islamorada, to Flamingo and Everglades City these dudes are living it.

~  *  ~

I fished with Eric Estrada a couple years ago, well, 2013, but it feels like more than a year and a bit. He joined our crew for something we never could figure a proper name for so I just ended up calling it the Florida Gathering… or something similar. Basically it was a bunch of bloggers and guides (and artists) getting together and fishing. We were supposed to take pics, vids, and write stories on our various blogs. I didn’t… yet. There’s stuff percolating, but nothing has been anything like put on paper. Not that it wasn’t a great (not to say epic) trip, cause it was. It was just hard to put into a simple statement. (Unless you’re this guy and can forge a week of mis-matched fishing mayhem into something akin to poetry.)

Anyways, back to Eric. He was a cool dude to fish with. Old school. A throwback to that old-world salt who not only knew his shit, but expected you to as well. And, when you (inevitably) screwed up he would tell you, not out of cruelty or spite, but out of an honest place of constructive criticism. I liked him. I also caught a big-ass Peacock Bass with him within like an hour of meeting the guy, so I might have been biased from the outset. Nevertheless, I truly enjoyed his enthusiasm and personality throughout our stay in Islmorada. I mean, not too many other anglers would be willing to drop everything, pickup a couple complete strangers from Miami International and then drive several hours and guide them for a couple days, for free! Who does that?

I’m glad to see Eric doing well and supporting local talent the way he does. The man works hard and has way of keeping in the background that seems neither braggadocios or falsely modest. It’s just who he is.

So, this is an official shout out, from one old-school salt to another.

Tight lines, brother.
WindKnot the Elder

Caymanian Fly Fishing Video


Caymanian Fly Fishing from joel jefferson on Vimeo.

Tarpon History & Habitat — Dr. Aaron Adams on Pine Isl. FLA.


I’ve just spent the last week with a group of like minded folk in Florida searching (mainly in vain) for tarpon. I was a lot further south than the area mentioned in this video, but it’s just another example of how far this influence of this sportfish has spread throughout the state.

The Keys Chronicles: Tarpon Season: The Exchange


April 25, 2012, 5:25 pm

BarJack: [On poling platform, back to sun straining against the 12 knot ESE breeze.] Ok, he’s facing away from you.

WindKnot: [Searching for fish shape in the glare.] Away? You sure?

[Recast. Slooow strip. The tarpon materializes as it turns.]

WindKnot: Got some kinda reaction from ‘im… oh, dude, that could be really good dude.

[Strip, wiggle, wiggle, pause… line jumps tight, rod bends, rod straightens, line slides back slack.]

WindKnot: Ugh! F***! F******!

BarJack: WindKnot, WindKnot, WindKnot, WindKnot...

WK: [Pulling in fly line and leader.]  Aaaah, duuude. F***! Alright. Your turn… Guarantee you I popped that 20-pound. I knew I was holding on a little too tight. That was an awesome eat… oh, noooo!

BJ: What?

WK: [Fingering the leader in disbelief.] You’re not going to believe where it broke.

BJ: Where?

WK: In the F***ing 40!

[Silence.]

BJ: And why would it broke in the 40, WindKnot? Can you explain that to me?

WK: …

BJ: Cause you told me that would never break in the 40. Never break. Never! Forget Wind Knot, your name is now Forty.

*

Roughly 26 minutes earlier:

BJ: Leader looks a little frayed there. Id retie, but thats just me.

WK: Dude, thats in the 40. [pull hard on line] Thatll never break.

BJ: Ok, man, you say so. I’m just sayin, I would change it. I dealt with a lot of frayed leaders on Diego and Id change it.

WK: Bro, look, I retied the 20-pound. Im telling you, that will break way before the 40.

BJ: Ok, man. You say so… it’s your fish.

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