Tag Archives: bonefishing

Guadeloupe: Video by Broke & Fly


 

Love the way this short film captures the joy (and frustration) of a (mostly) DIY fishing trip to an unknown location. I can relate, having done the same in Honduras, Panama, Little Cayman, Eleuthera and Acklins (both Bahamas). (Oh, yeah, and also the Florida Keys, which shows I have no idea of the boundary between reality and fantasy.)

Believe it or not, many of our guests on Grand Cayman do mostly DIY, and we encourage that. (Ok, if not actually encourage, then completely understand and are willing to give advice, fly selection and pointers to facilitate.) In fact, we are the “Local Experts” for the Cayman Islands on Rod Hamilton’s excellent website www.diyfishing.com—an great site that combines DIY fishing reports, guided reports, expert advice and some of the most comprehensive accommodations listings I’ve seen in a while. We’re happy to be a part of the DIYfishing community and (as always) wish you all:

Tight lines!
Davin Ebanks
Owner, Guide & Bonefishionado:
FISH BONES, Fly Fish Cayman!

Cayman Video: Just Below the Surface


Just Below the Surface from joel jefferson on Vimeo.

Fly Casting REVup Challenge: #7


“Beat the Wind! Use Your FULL Double-Haul.”


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As promised here is our SKIFF EPISODE, where we REVup our Double Haul for casting in the wind, getting extra distance, and throwing big flies. Skiff fishing provides its own challenges, especially where distance is concerned. Because a boat is bigger, makes more noise and throws a bigger shadow, fish can see/sense/feel it and us from farther away. That often means longer casts are essential just to get the fly away from the boat into a zone where the fish are not yet alerted to our presence.

This is a more advanced tip, but still comes back to basic principles of casting, namely: Slack is the Enemy! Many anglers who have learned to double-haul don’t take it far enough. Specifically, they don’t get their “hauling hand” back to their casting hand before they start their forward cast. If there is a lot of space between your hands, there’s a tendency for the casting hand to MOVE TOWARD the hauling hand at the beginning of the casting stroke. This puts slack in the system, reducing bend in the rod and stealing energy from the cast.

The difference between a good caster and an expert fly caster is that the latter will end their haul with their hands nearly together. This makes it impossible for the hands to move toward each other during the casting stroke. It also provides more distance for the haul on the forward cast.

HOMEWORK:
Work on getting the hauling hand back to the casting hand BEFORE you begin your forward stroke. The line will tell you how fast. Too fast and you’ll put slack in the line. Too slow and you won’t make it all the way back. It should feel as if the line is PULLING YOUR HAND back toward the rod, after you make the haul for the backcast.

Fly Casting REV Challenge: #6


“Avoid Shoulder Injury: Keep Your Elbow Close.”


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Good movement equals good results.

That’s our basic premise for this series.

This week we focus on “Casting Longevity”: using good movement (proper form) to reduce the risk of shoulder injury from fly casting. Yes! It’s a real thing. “Casting Elbow” and rotator cuff injuries are fairly common among those who cast a fly rod for hours.

The good news is you can help avoid injury through the practice of good movement. You could say that “good movement equals safe movement.”

We’ve talked about keeping the elbow low—not raising it too high during the cast. Let’s build on that concept and also keep the elbow INSIDE of our hand as we make our casting stroke. Keeping your elbow close is basically external rotation, which is proper form for any “pushing” motion, whether it be a pushup, a bench press, or a fly cast!

HOMEWORK:
Work on keeping your elbow close as you cast and your hand OUTSIDE of your elbow. To borrow from Lefty Kreh, KEEP THE ELBOW ON THE SHELF. This makes it easy to go straight back, and straight forward, which is the most efficient way of casting.

Next week we talk about special issues for casting from a skiff. Stay tuned!

Fly Casting REV Challenge: #5


“Fix your Back Cast: Direct your fly line.”


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Does your back-cast hit the water? Wish you could have your fly land a little softer and spook less fish? Use your thumb!

Your thumb can be used to direct your backcast… and the fly. If your thumb stops going down, the line will go down. If you point your thumb up, the line goes up. Simple.

The same is true on the forward cast. If you’re fishing for spooky bones in calm water, try a sidearm cast and turn your thumb “up” at the end. This will direct the fly line (and fly) up a the end of the cast and allow the fly to flutter down, as opposed to flipping over and splashing down.

HOMEWORK: Try directing your fly cast (and fly line) 1) down, 2) straight out and 3) up…. by focusing on where you point your thumb at the end of the cast. Practice until you can direct your flyline (and fly) at will.

Stay tuned as we pick apart some of the most basic fly casting errors, one at a time!

Fly Casting REV Challenge: #4


Good Casting Form: Don’t Throw It!

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This week we follow up on Episode #3 by clarifying an important aspect of good casting form: keeping the elbow down and resisting the urge to “throw” the flyline. At it’s core, fly casting is basically unrolling the fly line. We aren’t throwing it. However, raising the elbow up triggers that throwing instinct—it’s how we throw a baseball, after all—and prevents us from performing good casting mechanics because it’s very difficult to go straight back and straight forward when you raise your elbow.

In this video we demonstrate what good casting bio-mechanics look like, versus the poor mechanics of raising the elbow and trying to throw the fly line. And, we do it into the wind for good measure!

There is a fundamental principal at work here: only performing the movements that create a fly cast will produce a fly cast. If you perform some other movement—like throwing—you are expecting the impossible: that a good cast will come from a motion that has nothing to do with casting. It’s like going on the flat and performing the motions of flipping an omelet and hoping we miraculously get a fly cast.

However, a fly casting motion will always produce a fly cast. When we fail to make the cast, very often that is because we have ceased fly casting and performed another movement. Go back to fly casting, and all of a sudden we can again make the cast. It’s not magic, it’s not mysterious. It’s physics, and it’s reproducible. 2+2 always equals 4.

HOMEWORK: Practice keeping your elbow low. Make every casting stroke a photocopy of the previous one, especially the final, presentation cast! Nothing changes on the final cast.

DIY Bonefishing: My First Bonefish


I saw 3 or 4 swimming straight at me. It was almost surreal.  I did exactly as you had described in the book and without a hitch dropped the tan Crazy Charlie about 2 feet in front of the lead fish.  I watched astonished as he just kept coming with intent and then tipped…

 

Loved this story over on diybonefishing.com. It realistically depicts the challenge (and rewards) of catching the Grey Ghost of the flats on fly by yourself. It also demonstrates why some instruction—in this case Rod’s very useful book—is better than trying to figure the whole thing out from scratch.

Bonefish are pretty much 180 degrees from the species most anglers target on fly. Everything, from the presentation to the hook-set is wildly different from what we’re used to. I see it every day I guide. If you cast past the fish and pull the fly towards them: game over. If you “trout set”: game over. If you roll-cast and rip the water: game over. If you use tippet with the letter X anywhere in it: game over. Walk the flats and blind cast: game over.

Rod’s book contains the fundamentals of targeting bonefish on the fly and helps clarify all these issues. After that, it’s just up to you get out there and do it!

If you haven’t already subscribed to Rod Hamilton’s blog on that site, you should. Weekly stories, fishing reports and tips to get you fired up (and more prepared) for that next flats fishing venture.

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